history

The Last Time the Cubs Played the World Series…

These bars were open the last time the Cubs were in the World Series


It’s been a loooooooong time since the Chicago Cubs played in the World Series (1945 to be exact) and much, much, much longer since they won (108 years ago). This year, 2016, is historic in that the team that plays in the Friendly Confines on the North Side in that neighborhood called Wrigleyville clinched the pennant and headed on to win the World Series against the Cleveland Indians – a team that had a just-slightly-less-long World Series drought than the Cubs.

The last time the Cubs won the World Series in 1908, the first Model T Ford got assembled in Detroit; Arizona, New Mexico, Hawaii and Alaska weren’t states; and former president Lyndon Johnson, cosmetic magnate Estee Lauder and actors Bette Davis and Jimmy Stewart were all born that same year. They’ve all since passed away.

But what’s lasted since the Cubs won the World Series in 1908? A bunch of bars in Chicago. Maybe they stuck around to see the Cubs go all the way, but more likely? They stayed opened because they’re classics — and you can still go get a drink in them. So what are they, where are they and what year did they open?

Bar: Schaller’s Pump
Where: Bridgeport at 3714 S. Halsted
Year opened: 1881

Bar: Marge’s Still
Where: Old Town at 1758 N. Sedgwick (and it’s Chicago’s oldest continuously running tavern)
Year opened: 1885

Bar: Chipp Inn
Where: West Town at 832 N. Greenview (note: it’s cash only)
Year opened: 1897

Bar: The Berghoff
Where: The Loop at 17 W. Adams (got the city’s first post-Prohibition liquor license)
Year opened: 1898

Bar: The Green Mill
Where: Uptown at 4802 N. Broadway (Al Capone used to hang out here)
Year opened: 1907

[h/t to Do312 for the original post]

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